Feb 25, 2013

Herb and Onion Bread- 1972 (No Knead)


There have been some no-knead yeast bread recipes circulating lately. You may have seen them- some are being baked in mixing bowls. People are excited when they discover that they can have fresh-baked yeast bread without the time or trouble of traditional yeast bread recipes.

These recipes make me think of my older sister. She was always the cool one (and still is!). In the early 1970s, she was the Cool Big Sister who went away to college and came back at Christmas break wearing purple velvet bell bottoms and listening to Steppenwolf and Led Zeppelin. Later, she was the Earth Mother, raising her beautiful son on health food and working at the local vegetarian restaurant. 

Now and then: in 1975, Sis was a college grad, and I was finishing high school.

Around about that time, she gave me a wonderful cookbook, The Vegetarian Epicure by Anna Thomas, published in 1972. 
I immediately loved Ms. Thomas' Herb and Onion Bread, and made it for a long time. At some point I just kind of forgot about it...until the renewed popularity of the no-knead breads made me think of it again. 

I made it the other day, and it's just as I remembered: rustic, tender but with a little bit of chewiness to it, aromatic, and so flavorful. I baked it in a 1.5 quart Pyrex casserole dish. A few days later, I baked another batch in a loaf pan. This bread doesn't rise a whole lot, but it does make a nice-sized loaf. 


Baked in the loaf pan

Herb and Onion Bread (1972)
Makes 1 loaf

Ingredients:

1/2 cup milk
1 and 1/2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter
1 package yeast 
1/2 cup warm water (110 to 115 degrees F)
2 and 1/4 cups white or whole wheat flour (I used 1 and 1/4 cups unbleached white flour and 1 cup whole wheat flour)
1/4 cup minced fresh onion
1 teaspoon crushed, dried rosemary
1/2 teaspoon dried dill weed

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9 X 5" loaf pan with cooking spray.

Scald the milk and dissolve in it the sugar, salt, and butter; cool to lukewarm. In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast in the warm water. Add the cooled milk, flour, minced onion and herbs, and stir with a large wooden spoon.

When the batter is smooth, cover the bowl with a towel and let the dough rise in a warm place until triple in bulk- about 45 minutes. Stir down and beat vigorously for a few minutes, then turn into greased bread pan. Let it stand in a warm place about 10 minutes before putting it into oven. Bake about an hour. 


Baked in the round casserole

Ms. Thomas notes, "This is the fastest yeast bread I know, and a delicious one. I like to bake it late in the day, to serve still warm with dinner. The aroma of herbs is the greatest appetizer you could devise."








May have been shared at these great parties!




35 comments:

  1. Great recipe. THanks for sharing with us at In and Out of the Kitchen.
    Dawn co host
    http://spatulasonparade.blogspot.com

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    1. Hi, Dawn- In and Out of the Kitchen is always fun! :) Thanks for the visit!

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  2. Ooooooooh. I can just smell and taste the rosemary. Yum

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    1. Bintu, I love rosemary- especially in breads! I am so glad you came by- thanks! :)

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  3. i really like your blog, Joy, and i enjoyed reading this post! i featured your blog on my site, http://huntingfortheverybest.wordpress.com/2013/02/27/cool-food-blog-23/

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    1. Thank you so much, Dina! I will check it out! :)

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  4. thanks for sharing the recipe Joy - i am following you via email, thanks for following me!

    huggies♥
    rea

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    1. Rea, thank you- I am so glad to get to meet you! Thank you for coming by! :)

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  5. Do you have a recipe for an old fashioned pan fried bread, few ingredients, not corn bread or hoe cakes. But a bread. THANKS

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    1. Dawn, I don't, but I ran across one just recently. I'll see if I can locate it for you! Thanks for stopping by! :)

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  6. Happy weekend wishes to you and Thank you for sharing at the Thursday Favorite Things blog hop, your participation is what makes it so much fun. Come back to Katherines Corner,I posted the new giveaway today! xo

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    1. Thanks, Katherine, I'll certainly check it out! So glad you came by! :)

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  7. Thanks for the memories! We used to make this all the time in the 70`s. Although I don't know what it tastes like when it has completely cooled, it was make a loaf, eat a loaf while still warm. My mom found the recipe on the back of a yeast packet and the recipe just disappeared. I know what I am having tonight with my dinner.
    -Tami @ partyfood2go.com

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    1. Tami, that's so great that you remember this bread! If you make it, I hope you enjoy it! Thank you so much for visiting! :)

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  8. This has peaked my interest! :) Thank you for sharing!

    Julie

    www.betweenthesunsets.blogspot.com

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    1. Julie, I'm so glad you stopped by! :)

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  9. Hi! I'm a new follower from Let's Get Social. I also like the stories behind food and recipes.

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    1. Michelle, I'm so glad to meet you- thank you for visiting! :)

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  10. Hi, I popped over from the Let's Get Social Sunday hop. What fun memories for a fellow baby boomer to enjoy! I do miss those bell bottoms. They've tried to come back a couple of times but not nearly as groovy as back then. :)

    Thanks for the yummy-sounding recipe. Bet my senior mom would love it.

    Have a lovely week.

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    1. Thanks for coming over from Let's Get Social Sunday! :) Hope you have a lovely week as well!

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    1. Rachel, thank you- and thanks so much for stopping by! :)

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  12. What beautiful ladies, both then and now! :-) That looks like a GREAT recipe! YUM. Zannie @ mymixingspoon

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    1. Oh, Zannie, what a sweetheart you are! Thank you, and thanks so much for coming by! :)

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  13. Doughy delights are one of my weaknesses - looks so good!

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  14. Thank you, JoAnn, I have quite a bread weakness myself! :) Thanks for stopping by!

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  15. Joy, I LOVE this recipe and this post! Wow, did it bring back some memories! :)I love the photos of you and your sister! Thanks for sharing, am pinning and hope you'll share this wonderful recipe tonight at Best of the Weekend! Have a happy Friday. Love, Cindy

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    1. Thank you, Cindy, and thanks for the invitation- I will be there! I love Best of the Weekend! :)

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  16. OMG! I have this book and have used it so long, it's falling apart. Thanks for this wonderful recipe from a favorite book and beautiful memories. I remember making this one, but haven't made it in years. ;)

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    1. Mary Ann, I'm so glad to know you love this book, too! I don't meet many people who are familiar with it. Thanks for coming by- it was fun to hear from a Vegetarian Epicure fan! :)

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  17. A friend wanted my recipe for this bread, which I have been making since the 70's myself--my copier isn't cooperating this morning, so...long story, but I have this recipe in The Vegetarian Epicure--which I purchased at my college book store, and another version in Sunset Cook Book of Breads--also bought while in college. Both of the books are falling apart! I have always used the Sunset version--it calls for 2 1/4 tsp. of butter and suggests dill, rosemary, or other herb as well as the onion. Also, you can turn the batter into a greased 8 or 9 in. pie or cake pan--don't try to spread it to fit the pan as it will spread on its own, bake @ 350 for 1 hour, then brush w/melted butter, sprinkle lightly w/ salt. Cool on rack.

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    1. Is there any way you can post the recipe for pretzels from your Sunset Cook Book of Breads? My parents have misplaced their copy and they are dying to carry on the tradition of making pretzels on New Year's.

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  18. Hi, Anonymous! How fun that you have been baking this bread, and a close version, for so long! Because it's sooo good! Love the tips about baking in a pie or cake pan- thank you! :)

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  19. There is a restaurant in Northampton, MA called The Green Bean. They make an herb and onion bread served with almond gravy. It is to die for! I am hoping that this is the same recipe. I am trying it out now.

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    1. I hope you enjoyed the bread, Michele. Maybe, maybe, The Green Bean would share their recipe...restaurants do sometimes. :D Thank you for coming by!

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I would love to hear from you- thank you for taking the time to leave a comment! :) I read all comments, and answer them by email. If you ask a question that I think others might be wondering about, too, I'll answer here in the comment section! :)